Florence Attractions

Florence is one of the most important art cities in the world. The historical center is quite small and you can walk through it in about half an hour. But despite its size, it collects an incredible amount of art treasures and attractions. Starting from Piazza Duomo, it is possible to observe the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore, an architectural masterpiece realized by Arnolfo di Cambio in 1400. At the time it was the largest church in the world and another talented artist, Filippo Brunelleschi, came up with a very ambitious project for it: the famous dome. In fact, it’s still very hard to understand how it was built and how it can be still standing. Brunelleschi was a true genius, building a self-supporting structure. Right in front of the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore you can find the Baptistery, dedicated to the patron saint of the city, St. John the Baptist. The main façade faces east, in the direction of the Duomo.

The building has an octagonal plan. Leaving Piazza San Giovanni and its Baptistery, you can walk on via Calzaiuoli, one of the most popular streets, where thousands of tourists walk every day. In the past it represented a virtual link between religious power, symbolized by Piazza del Duomo with its cathedral, and the political power symbolized by Piazza Signoria and Palazzo Vecchio (which literally means Old Palace). The latter is one of the most popular and important buildings in the city of Florence. In fact, its real name was Palazzo della Signoria (litterally Palace of the Lordship), and for centuries it represented the the civil power of the city. Palazzo Vecchio has the typical structure of XIV century palaces, with its slender architecture, the bastions and the tower. Some of the interiors are spectacular, such as the Salone dei 200 and, most of all, the Salone dei 500: wide rooms with ceilings frescoed by Giorgio Vasari. Palazzo Vecchio was the residence of Cosimo de Medici until he moved to Palazzo Pitti (here the origin of the name “old palace”). Today is the seat of the Municipality of Florence, where civil ceremonies are celebrated.

On the left of Palazzo Vecchio you will see the Loggia dei Lanzi , also known as Loggia della Signoria. The name of Dei Lanzi comes from Lanzichenecchi, Cosimo de Medici’s bodyguards. Today it hosts splendid sculptures, including the Perseus, a masterpiece by Benvenuto Cellini. Overpassing Piazza della Signoria, you will find the Uffizi Gallery, one of the most famous museums in the world, which preserves artworks of inestimable value, such as the Birth of Venus by Botticelli . The gallery overlooks the Arno river, crossed by one of the city’s symbols, Ponte Vecchio. If today the bridge houses goldsmith shops, once it housed butchers: those were relegated over the bridge to avoid  the bad smells of the meat. Another symbol of the city is the Michelangelo’s David, whose copies can be seen both in front of the façade of Palazzo Vecchio and in Piazzale Michelangelo. The original instead is at the Accademia Gallery.

 

+39 348 3370110

+39 348 3370110